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Four Principles of Second Language Learning

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Duration: 02:12

Key content

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Key content

We introduce four principles of second language learning; specifically, the initial exposure to formulaic language, and the opportunities to hear/read/view te reo, as well as to speak/write/present – plus the opportunity to interact with others, using Māori.

Things to think about

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Things to think about

What changes can I make to my teaching of te reo to accommodate these second language principles (for example, formulaic language, input, output, interaction)?

Transcript

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Transcript

Dee Reid - Te Reo Māori Advisor, School Support Services, University of Waikato: These are the ten principles of second language teaching, no particular order, it doesn’t mean that number one is more important. All I’ve done is I’ve made the ones that are most appropriate in the early sort of stages, of beginning to teach or learn a language. And number one is around formulaic expressions and that’s just about words in isolation, not just vocab. So they are learning complete sentences or complete phrases in the context that they’ll use them. Things like, kia ora, things like pēhea ana, okay? Things like ka kite. You know it doesn’t matter about teaching grammar at that point, you don’t have to say why is it kia ora and not ka ora, okay? Grammar’s important but it comes later.

Number six, opportunities for your learners to see and hear te reo Māori, okay? And again as June alluded to, whether that’s explicit, so it’s language teaching episode or implicit like posters around the wall, it doesn’t matter.

Number seven, so...all that reo students have received, are they having a chance to use it? So are they having opportunities to kōrero te reo, to tuhituhi? Okay, so that’s just about that, don’t get hung up on the words...that’s all it is.

And number eight about interaction. And again, there’s different levels of interaction. ‘Cause are they getting to interact with you as the teacher? What about interaction with their peers, fellow learners? What about interactions with kuia or kaumātua, tumuaki? And see those occasions, or the people that they’re interacting with are all very different. So think about that one too.




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