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Te Aho Arataki Marau mō te Ako i Te Reo Māori - Kura Auraki

Curriculum Guidelines for Teaching and Learning Te Reo Māori in English-medium Schools: Years 1-13

Curriculum guidelines (PDF, 4 MB)

Te tupuranga
Levels 3 and 4: Developing communication skills in te reo Māori

Image of Levels 3 and 4 in the Language progression diagram.

Te tohu tauākī
Proficiency target statement

By the end of level 4, students can cope with a variety of routine situations when talking to speakers of te reo Māori. They can use familiar language with some flexibility and pick up some new language from its context. They can read and write simple notes and short letters and fill out simple forms. They can also use and respond to language, including directions and requests, that is likely to occur in familiar Māori settings. They are becoming more confident in using a range of language learning strategies.

Taumata 3
Level 3

Ētahi horopaki mō te ako i te reo
Possible language learning contexts

Possible socio-cultural themes

  • te marae (the marae)
  • te whare tupuna/te wharenui (ancestral house/meeting hall)
  • te wharekai (the dining hall)
  • manaakitanga (extending hospitality, honouring others, empathy)
  • pōwhiri (routines and procedures associated with a formal welcome)
  • tohu (directions, symbols, signs)

Possible topics

  • the marae: routines and procedures
  • modes of transport
  • sport and leisure gatherings
  • planning leisure-time events

Possible text types

  • karakia (prayers)
  • kīwaha (idioms)
  • kōrero pūrākau
  • pepehā (iwi-specific sayings)
  • waiata Māori (Māori songs)
  • whakataukī (proverbs)
  • informal and semi-formal conversational exchanges
  • maps and plans
  • posters, pamphlets, flyers
  • simple email and text messages
  • simple personal letters
  • class timetables
  • personal diaries

Ngā whāinga paetae
Achievement objectives

Students should be able to:
3.1 communicate, including comparing and contrasting, about habits, routines and customs
3.2 communicate about events and where they take place
3.3 give and follow directions
3.4 communicate, including comparing and contrasting, about how people travel
3.5 communicate about immediate past activities.

Ngā ara reo
Language modes

Listening image.
Whakarongo – Listening

By the end of level 3 students can:

  • understand specific detail and overall meaning in familiar contexts and in some unfamiliar contexts
  • understand a range of short oral texts consisting mainly of familiar language
  • get the gist of short oral texts that contain some unfamiliar language.

Reading image.
Pānui – Reading

By the end of level 3 students can:

  • understand specific detail and overall meaning in a range of short written texts consisting mainly of familiar language
  • get the gist of short written texts that contain some unfamiliar language.

Viewing image.
Mātakitaki – Viewing

By the end of level 3 students can:

  • identify and respond to some visual and verbal features of texts and the ways these features interact for particular purposes
  • understand and respond to a range of features in selected visual texts.

Speaking image.
Kōrero – Speaking

By the end of level 3 students can:

  • initiate and sustain short conversations
  • give short prepared talks on familiar topics
  • use generally appropriate pronunciation, stress, rhythm and intonation
  • express simple and original ideas
  • describe familiar events, people and things.

Writing image.
Tuhituhi – Writing

By the end of level 3 students can:

  • use resources, for example, dictionaries and glossaries to experiment with some new language in writing and to check spelling
  • prepare and write short texts on familiar topics
  • write simple personal letters and emails
  • use appropriate writing conventions.

Presenting image.
Whakaatu – Presenting

By the end of level 3 students can:

  • present texts in which visual and verbal features interact to produce particular meanings and effects
  • present or perform a kōrero pūrākau, whakataukī, pepehā, or waiata, making effective use of visual language features.

Taumata 4
Level 4

Ētahi horopaki mō te ako i te reo
Possible language learning contexts

Possible socio-cultural themes

Possible topics

  • planning and shopping for a hui
  • roles and duties at home, in the community, and at school
  • planning a visit away from home
  • telling the time

Possible text types

  • karakia (prayers)
  • kīwaha (idioms)
  • pepehā (iwi-specific sayings)
  • waiata Māori (Māori songs)
  • whakataukī (proverbs)
  • information brochures and pamphlets
  • announcements
  • informal and semi-formal conversational exchanges
  • informal notes and letters to family
  • menus
  • notes, cards, and letters of invitation, acceptance and refusal
  • posters
  • rules and regulations
  • shopping lists
  • simple advertisements
  • simple web pages
  • email and text messages

Nga whāinga paetae
Achievement objectives

Students should be able to:
4.1 request, offer, accept, and decline things, invitations and suggestions
4.2 communicate about plans for the immediate future
4.3 communicate about obligations and responsibilities
4.4 give and seek permission or agreement
4.5 communicate about the quality, quantity and cost of things.

Nga ara reo
Language modes

Listening image.
Whakarongo – Listening

By the end of level 4 students can:

  • make use of context and familiar language to work out meaning and relationships between things, events and ideas
  • understand specific details in contexts that may contain some unfamiliar language.

Reading image.
Panui – Reading

By the end of level 4 students can:

  • understand a range of short written texts that consist mainly of familiar language
  • understand overall meaning and specific detail in contexts that may contain some unfamiliar language
  • guess the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases used in familiar contexts.

Viewing image.
Matakitaki – Viewing

By the end of level 4 students can:

  • identify particular features of visual language and understand their significance in communicating information and ideas to specific audiences
  • understand and respond to combinations of visual and verbal language and their significance in communicating information and ideas to specific audiences.

Speaking image.
Korero – Speaking

By the end of level 4 students can:

  • engage in short personal conversations
  • make plans with friends, face to face and by telephone
  • initiate and sustain short conversations that involve polite social interactions, for example, declining invitations
  • give short prepared talks on familiar topics
  • use generally appropriate pronunciation, stress, rhythm and intonation.

Writing image.
Tuhituhi – Writing

By the end of level 4 students can:

  • use resources, for example, dictionaries and glossaries to experiment with new language and to review writing for accuracy
  • write short texts on familiar topics
  • plan longer written texts and write parts of these
  • use appropriate writing conventions
  • send text and email messages.

Presenting image.
Whakaatu – Presenting

By the end of level 4 students can:

  • communicate information, ideas, or narrative through texts in which visual and verbal features interact to produce particular meaning and effects
  • present or perform traditional or modern cultural items in selected settings.



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