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Te Aho Arataki Marau mō te Ako i Te Reo Māori - Kura Auraki

Curriculum Guidelines for Teaching and Learning Te Reo Māori in English-medium Schools: Years 1-13

Curriculum guidelines (PDF, 4 MB)

Te puāwaitanga
Levels 5 and 6: Achieving social competence in te reo Māori

Image of Levels 5 and 6 in the Language progression diagram.

Te tohu tauākī
Proficiency target statement

By the end of level 6, students can converse with te reo Māori speakers in familiar social situations and cope with some less familiar ones. They can use basic Māori language patterns spontaneously. They show a willingness to experiment with new language and to read independently. They can write short passages, personal letters, and simple formal letters in te reo Māori. Students are increasingly confident in using a range of strategies for learning te reo Māori and for communicating with others in predominantly Māori social contexts.

Taumata 5
Level 5

Ētahi horopaki mō te ako i te reo
Possible language learning contexts

Possible socio-cultural themes

Possible topics

  • fishing and food gathering
  • preparing and presenting food
  • recounting sport, leisure and cultural activities
  • recounting activities with family, friends and community

Possible text types

  • karakia (prayers)
  • kīwaha (idioms)
  • pepehā (iwi-specific sayings)
  • waiata Māori (Māori songs)
  • whakataukī (proverbs)
  • brochures
  • plans for models and structures
  • conversational exchanges
  • letters
  • maps (including weather maps)
  • questionnaires
  • reports
  • school timetables
  • simple interviews
  • simple speeches
  • web pages

Ngā whāinga paetae
Achievement objectives

Students should be able to:
5.1 communicate about past activities and events
5.2 communicate about present and past states, feelings and opinions
5.3 communicate about past habits and routines
5.4 describe, compare, and contrast people, places and things.

Ngā ara reo
Language modes

Listening image.
Whakarongo – Listening

By the end of level 5 students can:

  • make use of context and familiar language to work out meaning and relationships between things, events and ideas
  • understand specific details in contexts that may contain some unfamiliar language
  • distinguish between past and present actions and states.

Reading image.
Pānui – Reading

By the end of level 5 students can:

  • make use of context and familiar language to work out the relationships between things, events and ideas
  • understand specific details in contexts that may contain some unfamiliar language
  • distinguish between past and present actions and states.

Viewing image.
Mātakitaki – Viewing

By the end of level 5 students can:

  • understand and respond to information and ideas encountered in a variety of visual texts
  • identify particular features of visual language and understand their significance in communicating information to a specific audience for a specific purpose, when used on their own and also in combinations with verbal language.

Speaking image.
Kōrero – Speaking

By the end of level 5 students can:

  • initiate and sustain short conversations
  • give short talks on familiar topics in a range of contexts, past and present
  • discuss topics of mutual interest
  • use appropriate pronunciation, stress, rhythm and intonation.

Writing image.
Tuhituhi – Writing

By the end of level 5 students can:

  • use resources such as dictionaries and glossaries to experiment with new language and review writing for accuracy
  • write information on familiar topics in a range of contexts, past and present
  • use appropriate writing conventions
  • write a range of text types for a range of purposes and audiences.

Presenting image.
Whakaatu – Presenting

By the end of level 5 students can:

  • communicate information, ideas, or narrative through texts in which visual and verbal features interact to produce particular meanings and effects
  • present or perform a variety of visual texts for a range of purposes and audiences.

Taumata 6
Level 6

Ētahi horopaki mō te ako i te reo
Possible language learning contexts

Possible socio-cultural themes

Possible topics

  • tangihanga (funerals)
  • famous Māori people
  • Māori creative arts
  • entertainment, for example, television, music, movies and community events
  • health and well-being

Possible text types

  • karakia (prayers)
  • karanga (welcome call)
  • kīwaha (idioms)
  • pepehā (iwi-specific sayings)
  • waiata Māori (Māori songs)
  • whaikōrero (oration/speeches)
  • whakataukī (proverbs)
  • conversational exchanges
  • maps
  • letters, telephone calls, email
  • advertising posters
  • questionnaires
  • radio and television programmes
  • reports
  • extended stories and essays
  • simple interviews
  • simple speeches
  • graphs and tables
  • web pages

Ngā whāinga paetae
Achievement objectives

Students should be able to:
6.1 give and follow instructions
6.2 communicate about problems and solutions
6.3 communicate about immediate plans, hopes, wishes and intentions
6.4 communicate in formal situations.

Ngā ara reo
Language modes

Listening image.
Whakarongo – Listening

By the end of level 6 students can:

  • make use of context and familiar language to understand instructions and information in formal and informal contexts
  • understand specific details in contexts that may contain some unfamiliar language
  • distinguish between past and present actions and states.

Reading image.
nui – Reading

By the end of level 6 students can:

  • make use of context and familiar language to understand written instructions and information in formal and informal contexts
  • understand specific details in contexts that may contain some unfamiliar language
  • distinguish between past and present actions and states.

Viewing image.
Mātakitaki – Viewing

By the end of level 6 students can:

  • understand and respond to various meanings, ideas, and effects in visual texts for different purposes and audiences
  • use appropriate terminology to describe ways that visual and verbal language interact for specific effects and purposes.

Speaking image.
Kōrero – Speaking

By the end of level 6 students can:

  • initiate and sustain more extended conversations in both formal and informal contexts
  • discuss tasks in pairs or groups, for example, when sharing peer feedback on writing
  • give short talks in familiar contexts on familiar topics that relate to the past and present
  • use appropriate pronunciation, stress, rhythm, and intonation.

Writing image.
Tuhituhi – Writing

By the end of level 6 students can:

  • use resources such as dictionaries and glossaries to experiment with new language and to review writing for accuracy
  • write information on familiar topics, referring to past, present and future time
  • write a range of text types and more extended texts, for example, formal letters, personal letters, blogs, longer essays, descriptions and narratives
  • use a range of written planning tools, such as graphic organisers and mind maps
  • use appropriate writing conventions.

Presenting image.
Whakaatu – Presenting

By the end of level 6 students can:

  • use visual language alone to communicate with different audiences for different purposes
  • use combinations of visual and verbal language to communicate with different audiences for different purposes.



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